I’ve spent the last few years pushing my metaphoric and literal hard drive to extremities, logging in hundreds of flights and re-setting to a new time zone every week, diving into jam-packed itineraries and new experiences that had my storage hover on a constant low, a battery perpetually depleted down to 10% and a constant race against time with unexpected flight delays and deadlines. Unforeseeable delays caused the greatest distress, making the smallest inconveniences the most pronounced. While there’s no adrenaline rush quite like physically and mentally challenging yourself to a task that drives you to be resourceful in the moment, I’m starting to find that these memories can be lost when there’s not a moment of stillness to process these experiences from.

I’m going to start this off a bit candidly, frankly because I’m not a “new year new me” type of person. Change is a great thing, and the best life improvements can happen anytime of year with the right experience or source of inspiration. With that said, there’s no better time to reflect on the last year and dream about the future than the month of January, a month for a fresh slate and new beginnings. And as our world is changing in unexpected ways, I’m dedicating this January to the art of self-preservation.

This month I’m going to explore self-preservation from three angles. From the physical benefits of a boxing class and a steady yoga practice, to the mental, with books that have given me the most sound advice in times of emotional turbulence and apps that teach you how to free up head space. Lastly there’s the personal pursuit, an area I struggle with trading off creative clarity for an over crammed travel schedule.

Hope you guys enjoy this month’s theme, and I hope it will help you break into new habits for a more mindful and more productive 2017. This is a new type of journey for the site, one that is less focused about the physical places we go (though that will always have a permanent place on the site), but about uncovering meaning in an age where context is more critical than ever before. 

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